“Hot Mom” Facebook Photo Sparks Controversy

Happy Wednesday, dear readers! At this point, you guys are old hat at this: Gather ’round, grab your favorite beverage, and let’s meet over the metaphorical office water cooler to catch up on our favorite health-related stories this week. Don’t forget to let us know what you’ve been reading this week!

1. “Hot” mom stirs controversy on Facebook. Because what is social media for, if not for instigating? Maria Kang, a California resident and fitness enthusiast, posted a photo of herself in a sports bra and matching booty shorts surrounded by her three kids with the caption, “What’s your excuse?” The picture has since gone viral with more than 6 million views on Facebook and 12,000 comments ranging from “You go, girl” to “Not that I need an excuse for NOT working out, but here’s mine: fibromyalgia!” Check out the full photo on Yahoo! Shine, and then tell us what you think in the comments below or @Shape_Magazine.

2. Herbal supplements may not be as pure as you think. More proof that “natural” doesn’t guarantee that something is healthy: Canandian researchers tested 44 herbal products from 12 companies and found that 60 percent of them contained plant substances not listed on the label, and 20 percent included unlisted fillers such as wheat, rice, and soybeans. These hidden ingredients could cause problems for people with allergies and decrease the effectiveness of the supplements, researchers say.

3. Chicken plants in California will remain open. Despite calls to shut down three Foster Farms plants in California associated with the salmonella outbreak last week that sickened 300 people and sent half of them to the hospital, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will allow them to remain open. However, the USDA and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sent warning letters to Foster Farms, and the company had to present a plan to address the many violations found at the plants, including unsanitary surfaces, improper dressing procedures for employees, and fecal matter found on chicken carcasses.

4. Need a quick pick-me-up? Call your mom! You know how your mother is always nagging you to call her more? Turns out, she knows best after all (as always does seem to be the case). Recent research shows that interacting with people you love such as close friends or family members act as “microbursts,” or little things you can do to give you an instant shot of energy, and might even be more effective than coffee. It’s important to note that this research is preliminary and hasn’t yet been peer-reviewed, but if you’re close with your family, it can’t hurt, right?

5. Running may not help you lose weight. In frustrating news for runners everywhere, it turns out that it may not be the best form of cardio if you’re specifically looking to shed pounds. Fitness expert Adam Bornstein explains why here.

Read more:http://www.shape.com/blogs/shape-your-life/shape-shares-hot-mom-facebook-photo-sparks-controversy

What Are the Functions of High Frequency Skin Care Equipment?

Despite their design differences, the underlying functions of high frequency skin care machines are the same. These machines have a high rate of oscillation and produce heat. High frequency skin care machines minimize enlarged pores, treat acne and reduce fine facial lines. They also decongest puffy eyes, prevent the formation of dark eye circles, and rejuvenate the scalp.

Overall benefits

  • High frequency machines offer a safe and mild means to achieve skin rejuvenation. They include a glass electrode, which emits a subtle glow that causes a therapeutic tingling sensation on the skin surface. The machines produce high-frequency electrical currents and infrared light. These improve blood circulation and infuse the skin with ozone molecules, destroying bacteria and promoting lymphatic drainage. High-frequency machines increase the elastin and collagen production of the skin and assist to exfoliate dead skin cells. They also produce skin and muscle toning. Through the mild tissue warming effect and increased circulation in the upper layers of skin, underlying blood vessels begin to contract and force out toxins in the process. Increased blood circulation allows for cell renewal, while the elevated levels of collagen improve skin texture. Another function of high-frequency current application is the antibacterial function it performs. These machines produce mild heat and ozone that leaves the skin feeling rejuvenated and looking and feeling firmer and softer.

Acne

  • The application of high-frequency electrical current destroys acne-causing bacteria strains and removes toxins from the skin surface. Skin that has undergone high-frequency treatment is also more receptive to topical acne treatments.

Enlarged Pores

  • By controlling excess sebum production and making for a softer skin tone, high-frequency skin treatment reduces enlarged pores. The ozone produced by these machines works its way to the pore to oxidize any accumulated debris, thereby allowing the pore to revert to its original shape.

Fine Lines and Wrinkles

  • A main function of high-frequency skin care equipment is to increase blood circulation and give the skin-enriched oxygen in the form of ozone. The result of ozone application and increased circulation, makes for toned and nourished skin, which renews skin cells and diminishes the appearance of lines.

Puffy Eyes and Dark Eye Circles

  • The pulsating action of high-frequency skin care machines assists in lymphatic drainage and removes excess fluid, both of which reduce congested and puffy eyes. These machines increase blood circulation and make the skin more receptive to the benefits of topically applied creams and lotions.

The Best Running Tips of All Time

Many runners hold tension in their upper body, which can make your regular run feel twice as hard. Try this simple trick to check yourself: Roll up a sheet of paper and run with it for a few minutes (as if you were holding a baton in a 400-meter relay). If the paper comes back crunched, you are squeezing too hard! Allowing your hands to loosen up translates into reduced tension in the shoulders and less wasted energy.

Your feet are the only thing that comes into contact with the ground every single time you walk and run yet they’re almost always hidden away in shoes and never shown any love. To improve proprioception and loosen the tissues on the bottoms of your feet, place a small ball (a lacrosse ball, golf ball, or tennis ball work best) on the floor and gently roll from the heel to the ball of the foot. Try performing this simple massage technique (or flossing) for 30 seconds on each foot every morning and night. Make it part of your daily routine by flossing your feet every time you brush your teeth.

When you run, your brain is constantly communicating with your muscles to figure out how you can run more efficiently (i.e. with less muscle activation). This involuntarily process explains why all runners become more economical with experience. But you may be able to speed up the process.

Research shows that the neuromuscular system is most likely to discover more efficient ways to move when you push your limits (i.e. fatigue). To do this without risk of overtraining, end some of your easy runs with a “fast finish.” Wait until the last five or 10 minutes of a longer run and then speed up to an effort level of six or seven on a scale of one to 10.

For perfect running form, your legs should move like the hands on a clock (Imagine tracing a clock with your pedal stroke on a bike. That’s where this clock would be in relation to your body.) When you run, think about bringing your foot up to the 12 o’clock position, reaching out to 3 o’clock, striking the ground directly beneath your body at 6 o’clock, then pushing off to 9 o’clock behind you. This circular motion mimics cycling and allows fast turnover.

read more:http://www.shape.com/fitness/training-plans/best-running-tips-all-time/slide/5

The Look Good in Leggings Workout

The Look Good in Leggings Workout

Get ready to look fierce from every angle in your favorite leggings this fall. These four simple moves help lift, shape, and define every muscle below your waist, while also challenging your core.

How it works: Up to four days per week, do 1 set of each exercise back to back, with no rest between moves. Repeat the full circuit 3 times total, resting 30 to 60 seconds between rounds.
You will need: Bench
Stand to the side of step, with left foot on top of step. Lower into a squat, reaching both arms straight out in front of chest.
  1. AStand to the side of step, with left foot on top of step. Lower into a squat, reaching both arms straight out in front of chest.
  2. BRise up out of squat, and as legs extend, shift weight into left leg and stand up on top of step, bending right knee and curling heel behind body as you tighten abs, squeeze inner thighs together, and bend elbows behind torso. Step back to the starting position and repeat. Complete all reps on the first side, then switch legs and repeat to complete the set.

Begin in a split stance with right foot on top of a box or step. Lower into a lunge, bending back knee directly under hip, as both arms extend overhead.

 

  1. ABegin in a split stance with right foot on top of a box or step. Lower into a lunge, bending back knee directly under hip, as both arms extend overhead.
  2. BShift weight into right leg and stand up onto step, extending left (back) leg straight behind hip as arms lower by sides (avoid leaning forward with torso as leg lifts). Hold for 1 count, then lower to return to the starting position. Complete all reps on the first side, then switch legs and repeat to complete the set.

Lie faceup with elbows bent 90-degrees by sides, feet flexed, and heels on top of step (bring hips close enough to step that knees line up over hips). Extend left leg as straight as possible to ceiling.

 

  1. ALie faceup with elbows bent 90-degrees by sides, feet flexed, and heels on top of step (bring hips close enough to step that knees line up over hips). Extend left leg as straight as possible to ceiling.
  2. BTighten abs and press elbows down into the floor to lift hips, driving left heel up towards ceiling. Lower hips to floor, only lightly tapping the ground before lifting back up. Complete all reps on the first side, then switch legs and repeat to complete the set.

read more:http://www.shape.com/fitness/workouts/look-good-leggings-workout/#

Face Cleansing tips

Your face looks back at you from the mirror…does it look dry or oily or listless, or does it look glowing and radiant?

This depends on how you take care of your face. Start by giving yourself 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes at bedtime.
Face Cleansing - Beauty Tips
Tip 1:

Take 1 tbsp of un-boiled milk, dip a small pad of cotton wool in this and rub on the face gently. Use circular movements, use upward strokes on the neck area. Leave this on for 15 minutes. Wash with cold water.Tip 2:

Take a thick slice of cucumber. Don’t peel the slice, rub in a circular motion all over the face and neck areas. Wash after 15 minutes.

Tip 3:

Halve a tomato, gently rub over face and neck and wash after 15 minutes.

Tip 4:

Take the half of a lime peel, from which the juice has been extracted, rub this firmly on the face and the neck. Using a Scrub-(once in 3-4 days).

After washing off the milk or juice – take a tsp of oat bran or wheat husk or gram flour (besan). Make a paste with a few drops of water and rub the face and neck gently with this. This sloughs away the dead cells and gives the face a glow. Don’t use soap, just splash on cold water that will act as an astringent and close the pores.

Tip 5:

Use green gram powder or rice flour mixed with curds instead.

Oily Skin: If the face is oily,

After a bath as a base for make-up use some diluted limejuice to dab on before application of foundation or any other make-up.

Tip 6:

Diluted buttermilk dabbed on the face and left for 15 minutes, gently wipe with moist cotton wool before applying make-up.

Tip 7:

Rub the face well with an ice cube.

Tip 8:

Slice an Apple into thin slices. Place these on the face and leave for 15 minutes. These soak up the extra oil and helps to close pores.

How Often Do You Wash Your Face?

 

 

This morning I was poking around one of my favorite style-photography sites (the toujours-charmante Garance Doré’s) and saw the headline “Water.” In it, she pays her dermato a visit with a long list of questions and skincare concerns and comes away with just one startling piece of advice:

“Your skin is very good. It’s just exhausted. The only thing you need is to: Stop water.

I almost started to cry. I’ve been told for years that water is not good for my skin (is it good for anybody’s skin?) but I resist. I rebel. For me, being clean equals using water and something that foams a lot. I knew that one day at the turn of my century, I would pay the price of my mindlessness, but not unlike Pete Doherty, I prefered to ignore the advice of people who cared for me.

I was always choosing the dark side of the force, and that is to say : WATER

I’ve heard of this before and I think it’s definitely a French thing, but it got me thinking. How do you keep your face from getting wet in the shower? And if you’re not using any water but you are wearing makeup, then whaaaa? Using a cream cleanser and wiping it off with cotton? Wouldn’t that leave residue that you would then need a toner or something to get off? Seems laborious to me! And it also seems like it would necessitate more products, not fewer, which is not in keeping with my less-is-more philosophy. Maybe Garance’s skin is exhausted from the foaming cleanser she’s using? Who knows! My suspicion has always been that water is less of a problem; it’s what you use with it that can make your skin sad.

We’ve talked about being dirty over here before. We even roped you all into a no-soap challenge that was, in our estimation, a pretty big success! But we exempted washing your hair, your face and your underarms/privates because, well, that seemed the right thing to do.

There were times (years, actually) when I didn’t feel clean unless I washed my face upwards of three times a day, and wiped it down with alcohol-laced toners. Now I know better, and what works best for me is if I only wash my face at night, to get off my makeup, sunscreen and grime from the filthy city I live in. But I don’t wash it in the morning; I use a clean muslin cloth and wipe down with…water. At night I use Tata Harper’s Regenerating Cleanser.

What’s your take? Do you wash your face twice a day, and if so, why? And have you ever forsaken water?

read more:http://nomoredirtylooks.com/2011/06/how-often-do-you-wash-your-face/

Is Your Diet Aging You?

Simple strategies to keep you young, inside and out.

Did you look in the mirror this morning and think, “Wow, I look great!”? Or did you think, “When did I get so old?”

If it was the latter, you might want to take a look at your refrigerator, kitchen cupboard, and dinner table for one of the culprits.

burger and fries meal

Aging happens to all of us, of course. And there’s no way to put the brakes on it, no matter what the latest “nutraceuticals” may claim. But an unhealthy diet can send your aging process into overdrive and leave you looking years older than you really are. And, it probably isn’t doing the inside of your body any favors, either.

Quality Counts

Timothy Harlan, assistant professor of medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine, a former restaurateur known as “Dr. Gourmet,” and author of Just Tell Me What to Eat!, says, “There’s an incredible amount of evidence that says that eating junk puts your body into an inflammatory state. Poor-quality foods, like trans fats, cause inflammation — and aging is basically a chronic inflammatory state.” Harlan asks: “Can you look older because you’re eating crap?” And he answers: “Absolutely.”

For example, too much sugar and processed carbohydrates in the diet can lead to the production of what are called AGEs — advanced glycation end products. “These are associated with a number of diseases, like heart disease and diabetes,” says Andrea Giancoli, MPH, RD, a nutrition policy consultant for the California Center for Public Health Advocacy. What’s more, she says, “they also damage the collagen and fibers of your skin.”

But it’s not just your looks that are on the line. Eating more than you should of foods that ramp up inflammation — or that clog your arteries or pack on extra pounds — can be bad news, from head to toe.

Foods to Limit

  1. Potato chips and French fries. Anything that’s deep-fried in oil is laden with trans fats, which contribute to inflammation throughout your body. According to the American Heart Association, you should keep trans fats to less than 1% of your daily diet.
  2. Doughnuts and sugary pastries. These pack a multiple whammy. Often they’re high in trans fats and, of course, they’re packed with sugar, which is also linked to inflammation. And they produce those wrinkle-generating AGEs Giancoli talks about.
  3. Hot dogs, bacon, and pepperoni — any processed meats. Sad to say, the meats on your favorite home-delivery pizza and ballpark dogs aren’t doing you any favors. They’re high in saturated fats and also contain nitrates, both of which contribute to the inflammatory process.
  4. Less-than-lean red meats. The key with meat is to keep it lean to minimize saturated fats, which are big producers of inflammation and no friend of your arteries. The USDA’s 2010 dietary guidelines recommend eating a variety of protein foods, including lean meats. The American Heart Association suggests that you keep saturated fats from all sources (not just red meat) to less than 7% of your daily calorie intake.
  5. Alcohol. This is a tough one: Some alcohol may be good for you, but too much can absolutely age you prematurely. “Research says there’s a sweet spot for alcohol,” Harlan says. That’s one drink per day for women (such as a 5-ounce glass of wine or 12-ounce glass of beer) and two for men. If you drink, on average, one or two alcoholic drinks per day, that may be good for your heart. More than that and you may be revving the aging process and its associated diseases such as liver disease and certain cancers. If you don’t drink, health experts don’t advise you to start. And if you do drink, talk to your doctor to make sure your drinking is in line with your particular health concerns.

More importantly, Harlan says, eating a diet rich in high-quality foods can reduce inflammation and help keep you looking your best. “It’s very clear that following a Mediterranean-style diet reduces the risk of a number of illnesses associated with aging, like cancer, Alzheimer’s, and heart disease.”

Foods to Favor

Harlan and Giancoli are both reluctant to pick out a list of “superfoods” that help to keep you looking young and healthy.

“There are people who have these theories that foods that are very high in antioxidants somehow slow the aging process. And there is some scant evidence of that in animal models,” Harlan says. “But don’t just pick out a few foods and focus on them. The minute you start talking about individual foods, people lose sight of the big picture.”

So stay away from fad diets that are all about salmon and acai berries, he says. “I want you to eat lots of broccoli and sweet potatoes and salmon and chickpeas and good-quality chicken. Eat a healthy variety of foods and that will keep you looking your best.”

That’s not just one opinion. In general, many sources are now saying that a traditional Mediterranean style diet — rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein — is your best option for overall health.

Another important factor, Giancoli adds, is eating wholefoods, closest to their natural state as possible. “Don’t just eat plants; eat them pretty close to how they were when they came out of the ground or off the tree,” she says.

So instead of “superfoods,” here’s a list of five foods that are key elements of the Mediterranean diet and are examples of the kinds of foods you need to be getting more of.

  1. Romaine lettuce. Plain old Romaine salad is high in vitamins A and C, antioxidant vitamins that help battle inflammation. Other dark leafy greens that should be on your list include broccoli, spinach, arugula, watercress, escarole, and endive.
  2. Tomatoes. Along with watermelon, grapefruit, guavas, asparagus, and red cabbage, tomatoes are particularly high in the antioxidant lycopene.
  3. Salmon. As with other marine fish such as tuna and herring, salmon is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which fight inflammation.
  4. Lentils. Beans are one of Harlan’s favorite sources of protein and are loaded with fiber and antioxidant vitamins. Try black beans, split peas, limas, pintos, and even fat-free refried beans. “Your skin is essentially made of protein, so if you don’t get enough healthy protein in your diet, your skin will reflect that,” Giancoli says. “Along with fish, beans are a great way to get it.”
  5. Oatmeal. Studies have found that whole grains such as oatmeal, whole wheat breads and pastas, brown rice, couscous, and quinoa help to reduce inflammation. “These also have B vitamins in them, like thiamine and riboflavin, which are important for skin as well,” Giancoli says. “Deficiencies in them cause rashes and scaly skin appearance.”

And you have to keep eating healthy to stay looking good. “Skin sloughs off all the time, so you need regular incoming doses of vitamins, nutrients, plant chemicals that we call phytonutrients, healthy fats, and proteins,” Giancoli says. “If you’re not getting enough of the good stuff on a regular basis, you won’t be able to produce healthy new skin cells in the way that you should.”

If you eat a diet like this, will you look better in the mirror? “That depends,” Harlan says. “I looked pretty ugly in the mirror before! But if you eat healthy, you are absolutely going to look better.”

read more:http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/is-your-diet-aging-you?page=3